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THE Film

The seldom seen world of women without men Subscription

23 April 2015 | By Davina Quinlivan

Films about female kinship and community are rare, precious exceptions to cinema’s enduring focus on groups of men, says Davina Quinlivan

Force Majeure, directed by Ruben Östlund Subscription

9 April 2015 | By Duncan Wu

The repercussions of a man’s cowardice at a French ski resort entertain Duncan Wu in a most uncomfortable way

Still Alice, directed by Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland Subscription

5 March 2015 | By Lucy Bolton

Julianne Moore gives a complex, nuanced portrait of a professor confounded and isolated by Alzheimer’s, writes Lucy Bolton

Lives and loves of geniuses Subscription

12 February 2015

Recent films fail to recognise the support women give to famous male artists or scientists, says Mary Evans

Twenty-five years of New Queer Cinema Subscription

5 February 2015

Nathan Smith looks back at a film movement that has challenged stigmas and defended the transgressive

Inherent Vice, directed by Paul Thomas Anderson Subscription

29 January 2015

The work of Thomas Pynchon makes its Hollywood debut in a nostalgia noir tale faithfully adapted by a kindred spirit

Electricity, directed by Bryn Higgins Subscription

11 December 2014

Agyness Deyn unflinchingly portrays a woman’s experience of epilepsy in this unconventional fairy tale

Manakamana, directed by Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez Subscription

4 December 2014

Footage shot in a cable car carrying pilgrims to a Nepalese temple makes for profoundly moving cinema, writes Duncan Wu

Mr. Turner, directed by Mike Leigh Subscription

30 October 2014

Philip Kemp on a cinematic portrait of an artist that does justice to the man and his work

Cinema and food: a feast for the eyes Subscription

25 September 2014

Cinema is the perfect medium to examine the role and ritual of food in family, in love and in bringing people together. Davina Quinlivan feasts her eyes

Grand Piano, directed by Eugenio Mira Subscription

18 September 2014

An implausible and ludicrous piece of hokum that steals its best ideas succeeds because of its vices, says Duncan Wu

At Berkeley, directed by Frederick Wiseman Subscription

11 September 2014

Insight into life in an iconic institution in flux makes Martin McQuillan fear for the future of public universities in the US

Wakolda, directed by Lucía Puenzo Subscription

7 August 2014

Disquiet grows into horror as an infamous Nazi doctor takes an unhealthy interest in a young girl in Argentina, finds Philip Kemp

Joe, directed by David Gordon Green Subscription

24 July 2014

Nicolas Cage and Tye Sheridan stand out in a compelling tale of torment and redemption, says Duncan Wu

Girls on film Subscription

3 July 2014

The Cinema of Childhood, a touring festival, spurs Davina Quinlivan to reflect on screen representations of bodies in flux

The Golden Dream, directed by Diego Quemada-Díez Subscription

26 June 2014

Warmth and compassion override the wretchedness in an authentic portrayal of illegal immigrants trying to enter the US, says Philip Kemp

Belle, directed by Amma Asante Subscription

12 June 2014

Catherine Clinton admires the story of a mixed-race girl with an aristocratic upbringing told against the background of the abolition of slavery

Grace of Monaco, directed by Olivier Dahan Subscription

5 June 2014

A biopic fails to make sense or cinema of her princess life: Grace Kelly’s own films attest to her greatness as actor and star, says Lucy Bolton

The Two Faces of January, directed by Hossein Amini Subscription

15 May 2014

Mary Evans on a film adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s 1964 novel that questions the limits placed on the imagination by ‘normal’ behaviour

Variety Acts and Turns of the Early 1930s Subscription

3 April 2014

Music hall constantly adapted to survive, yet the cultural form is often dismissed. Fern Riddell considers our collective memory

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