UCL steps up to world class

University College London took another step towards creating one of the largest university medical schools in the world after merging this week with the Institute of Child Health in Great Ormond Street.

The institute of child health officially became part of UCL on September 1. It follows the recent merger between UCL and the Institute of Opthalmology, based at Moorfields Hospital.

Provisional dates have also been set for the mergers of the Institute of Neurology, in Queen's Square, in a year's time, and the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine, in Hampstead, in August 1998.

Sir Derek Roberts, UCL's provost, said: "These mergers will take UCL into a leading position not just within Europe but the world."

The three institutes and the Royal Free School of Medicine will form part of a new Royal Free and University College Medical School of the University of London.

The institutes will double the number of UCL's postgraduate medical institutions to six. The college already includes the Institute of Orthopaedics, Institute of Laryngology and Otology and the Institute of Urology and Nephrology.

The addition of the Royal Free Medical School will complement UCL's medical school. The mergers will add 4 full-time academics and 291 research fellows and assistants to UCL.

Impetus for the changes came from the Tomlinson report, in 1992, which recommended that medical schools merge with multifaculty colleges. The aim is that medical schools benefit by being able to use hi-tech equipment they might otherwise be unable to afford.

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

  • Elly Walton illustration (16 July 2015)

Whether in jest or not, sexist language shows an insensitivity to gender issues at odds with academic values, argues Dorothy Bishop

  • Two men looking surprised in an office

Report says projects fail when scholars obsessed with “shiny things” ignore business needs

  • Tony Little, Eton College headmaster, 2007

Tony Little points to ‘increasing gap’ between teaching standards at sixth form and university

  • AC Grayling, writer and academic

A. C. Grayling’s ‘Oxbridge-style’ private college strikes agreement with post-92 institution