Integration of Biomarkers in Cancer Risk Assessment -- Utrecht, Netherlands, 19-20 October

Brussels, 19 Sep 2006

The EU Network of Excellence Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility (ECNIS) has organised a workshop entitled, 'Integration of Biomarkers in Cancer Risk Assessment', to be held in Utrech, Netherlands between 19 and 20 October. The workshop aims to be a forum for the exchange of ideas and new information on various aspects of integration of biomarkers in cancer risk assessment. The workshop will focus on both the epidemiological and toxicological view of how biomarkers could be used in cancer risk assessment. The key word is integration. The aim is to go beyond the use of markers solely for hazard identification or mechanistic support and to explore opportunities of the use of biomarkers in integrated quantitative risk assessment.

The workshop will also include invited speakers from throughout Europe, and a poster and lecture session where delegates can present their work.For further information and to register, go to the event website:
here

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