Increase in attacks on Jews

Several disturbing trends in racially motivated attacks against Jews, in many countries, are highlighted in the 1994 report of Tel Aviv University Anti-Semitism Study Project. The report indicates a sharp increase in the number of attacks with intent to kill carried out against Jews: 72 cases in 1994 compared with 42 in 1993. Great Britain is identified, for the third year running, as the most violent country regarding anti-Semitic and racist activities.

The report confirms that radical Islamic groups are developing links with local Neo-Nazi and fascist organisations. Evidence from other sources suggests that, following the massacre of Muslim worshippers at Hebron last year, militant Islamic groups have found willing collaborators among extreme rightwing ele ments in several European countries.

The report describes several examples of such co-operation ranging from radio broadcasts to the writing and dissemination of published material. Dina Porat, head of the group that prepared the report, pointed out that anti-Semitic groups increasingly use the Internet computer network to distribute their message.

Despite the high profile given to ceremonies marking the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps, the report also indicates that denial of the Holocaust continues to receive support in many countries.

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