Bett show: four areas of technology that could transform universities

Google Glass, 3D printers and more: our expert evaluates the gadgets

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This year’s British Education and Training Technology Show, known as Bett, took place last month and marked the 30th anniversary of this behemoth of the conference calendar.

More than 35,000 delegates packed into the ExCel Centre in East London along with 700 exhibitors hoping to catch the attention of those charged with kitting out their institution with the latest technology solutions – from big hitters such as Samsung, Google and Microsoft, to small start-ups hoping to get their products noticed for the first time.

About 300 of those exhibiting claimed to be of relevance to the higher education sector, and we have picked out four areas of technology that were on show. But how innovative are they? Will they revolutionise the way universities operate? We asked Andrew McGregor, deputy chief innovation officer at education technology consortium Jisc, to give us his thoughts and mark each one out of 10 in four areas: innovation, potential to revolutionise higher education, usefulness and novelty value.

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