£6m drive will focus on alliances

The Government has outlined how it plans to spend £6 million a year on the next Prime Minister's Initiative to attract more overseas students to the UK, writes Tony Tysome.

At a conference on international students in London last Thursday, Bill Rammell, the Minister for Higher Education, said that the second phase of the PMI, due to be launched next month, will focus on supporting and stimulating new partnerships between UK and foreign institutions.

It will identify and develop overseas markets and work to improve international students' experiences in the UK.

Mr Rammell told delegates at the conference that it was important to recognise that the international student market was changing rapidly and that competition for recruits was growing across the world.

UK courses delivered overseas in partnership with foreign institutions could become as important as courses provided at home, he said.

Opportunities for collaboration will be discussed at a second UK-China Education Summit in London on Tuesday.

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