Wizard way to objects

Object-oriented technology, considered by its supporters to be the best way to model reality and build software, was the subject of a one-hour conference on the Internet last week. The event was staged by Leicester's De Montfort University, with support from IBM, as part of the Teaching and Training in the Technology of Object conference.

More than 30 people found their way to the discussion, in the university's MOO, a software world which resembles an adventure game. (The difference is that skilled users can create objects and make them behave in interesting ways.) MultiMedia spent several minutes in the entrance hall before a friendly wizard offered directions. The discussion, conducted by keyboard, progressed slowly. But participants were free to wander into the "virtual trade show" of information from software companies, or to use the "whisper" facility to chat privately.

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