Oxford's own Edward?

In "Rebels in push for vote on Oxford v-c" (February 3), Peter Oppenheimer says: "Many of us believe that (John) Hood thinks of the new governance structure as a lever by which he can increase his own power, cutting out insiders and bringing in outsiders who will do his bidding."

Does this remind anyone of King Edward "The Confessor" bringing in his Norman outsiders to rule England cutting out the Anglo-Saxon nobility from important posts? Edward survived rebellions (just) and we know what happened after his death in 1066, don't we?

Christopher Lillington-Martin
Wantage

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