Majority judgement

I would like to respond to the letter from Richard Shearman of the Engineering Council ("Open to suggestions", 13 May).

Readers may remember that Shearman took issue with my comments on the role of accrediting bodies in my article "Putting the world back in working order" (29 April).

I have now received 58 comments on the article. Many correspondents took the trouble to write at length and I am very grateful for all the comments received. Of those responses, 54 were very supportive of my arguments. Four were not: one was from Shearman, one came from a member of the Engineering Council's board, one was written by a professor at the University of Oxford and one came from a University of Cambridge professor.

The other correspondents include three vice-chancellors, academics, senior business leaders and two students. I rest my case.

John Turner, Pro vice-chancellor, University of Portsmouth.

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