Elements of Environmental Engineering: Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Thermodynamics is a vitally important area in most physical sciences and engineering disciplines; thus it is imperative for individuals pursuing a degree in those fields to grasp the fundamentals of this subject area. Kalliat Valsaraj aims this text uncompromisingly at students who have covered at least the first year of an undergraduate degree in a physical sciences or engineering discipline; those who do not possess a certain level of understanding of physics, chemistry and maths will find it very intimidating. The book impressively utilises illustrations and worked examples as appropriate to facilitate comprehension. Furthermore, there is regular reference to environmental implications, which is an important topical issue. Valsaraj has successfully struck a balance between text, tables and illustrations.

Who is it for? Undergraduates and postgraduates from physical sciences and environmental engineering disciplines.

Presentation: Very good balance between text and illustrations.

Would you recommend it? Yes, primarily for undergraduate students in environmental engineering.

Elements of Environmental Engineering: Thermodynamics and Kinetics

Author: Kalliat Valsaraj

Edition: Third revised

Publisher: CRC Press

Pages: 484

Price: £49.99

ISBN: 9781420078190

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