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Top journals in Linguistics

Top journals in Linguistics
Data provided by Thomson Reuters from its Journal Citation Reports – Social Sciences, 2009
 JournalArticles in 2009Total cites in 2009Impact factorFive-year impact
1Journal of Memory and Language605,1733.2213.814
2Computational Linguistics171,4672.2123.722
3Language Learning and Technology125622.5313.575
4Brain and Language644,7212.9733.105
5Studies in Second Language Acquisition199561.3232.881
6Language242,3091.8862.794
7Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research1113,5912.3472.714
8Cognitive Linguistics294890.8142.560
9Journal of Fluency Disorders175352.1882.425
10Journal of Communication Disorders371,1571.6392.276
11Language and Cognitive Processes551,6342.0002.233
12Mind and Language268252.0912.173
13Modern Language Journal391,2001.9142.040
14Linguistic Inquiry231,6911.4502.020
15Applied Linguistics231,0861.4691.991
16Second Language Research135021.2811.924
17Journal of Phonetics321,1661.5251.902
18Applied Psycholinguistics311,0011.2381.887
19International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders456701.3301.859
20American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology308251.8791.829

Thomson Reuters classifies 93 journals in the linguistics category in its Journal Citation Reports – Social Sciences for 2009. The table above lists the top 20 publications ranked by their five-year impact, which is defined as the total number of citations in 2009 made to papers published in the journals in 2004-08, divided by the number of citable items (research articles and reviews) from 2004 to 2008.

This measure is different from the more traditional impact factor, which is defined as total citations in Year 3 to papers in a journal in Years 1 and 2, divided by the number of citable items in Years 1 and 2. The five–year impact factor measures average influence over a longer period than the traditional impact factor, and is particularly useful in examining journal influence for those fields in the sciences and social sciences that require a relatively longer period of time to elapse before they typically achieve their peak level of citations post-publication.

The number of citable items recorded from each journal in 2009 is provided to give the reader some idea about the size and reach of the journals in question. The number of total citations in 2009 represents citations recorded that year to papers in the journal of any year to illustrate the publications’ contemporary gross influence.

Of course, as the results indicate, those journals with a long history and ones that have published larger numbers of papers have more opportunity to receive citations than those with shorter histories and smaller output.

For more information and insights into Thomson Reuters’ Journal Citation Reports, visit: http://go.thomsonreuters.com/jcr

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