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THE Letters

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Letters for publication in Times Higher Education should arrive by 9am Monday. We reserve the right to edit all contributions. Authors can expect to receive an email version of their letter for correction of fact, but not length, on Monday. Please provide a daytime telephone number. Letters published will, along with the rest of the publication, be stored electronically and republished in derivative versions of Times Higher Education on computer networks and elsewhere unless the author specifically refuses permission for us to do so.

Managers and Moocs at root of OU’s woes Subscription

26 February 2015

The University and College Union branch at the Open University is extremely concerned about the deficit and falling student numbers reported in Times Higher Education

No tuition fees on principle Subscription

26 February 2015

Students at the University of the West of Scotland have consistently rejected the idea of tuition fees mentioned by Craig Mahoney, principal and vice-chancellor of UWS

Sad retreat from vital area Subscription

26 February 2015

I am an academic at the University of Manchester who also sits on the senate, which has twice discussed the closure of the Middle Eastern studies undergraduate programmes

Mental health starts early Subscription

26 February 2015

Thank you for raising the pressing issue of student mental well-being. Every university has a pastoral duty of care for its students, and especially those still in their teens who may be living far away from home for the first time

Ethics of journal’s surplus Subscription

26 February 2015

As debates rage on how to spend the £1.2 million surplus of The Sociological Review, it is disappointing that there is no comment on how this surplus was possible or whether it is ethical

We’re fighting on all fronts Subscription

26 February 2015

How on earth has Anthony Kelly come to the conclusion that universities have been silent about the government’s reforms to teacher education in England, or are somehow to blame for the progression of Michael Gove’s agenda?

Engineering solutions Subscription

26 February 2015

The skills gap in UK engineering has taught us a valuable lesson: there is no such thing as a quick fix. British engineering will progress only through sustained collaborative efforts, consistency and a cultural shift

On song with research Subscription

26 February 2015

Although it is possible to have a residual sympathy for David Oldfield’s assertion that lecturers in the arts and humanities spend too much time researching rather than teaching, I wonder whether…

Arts research is a driver, not a spotter Subscription

19 February 2015

I read David Oldfield’s article with a mixture of irritation and disbelief

Making the grade Subscription

19 February 2015

Among the many important points that Danny Dorling makes about admissions and participation in the English higher education system…

An affecting presence Subscription

19 February 2015

Throughout his career, Sir David Watson sought to develop an understanding of higher education through research

Canny operators Subscription

19 February 2015

Two recent stories in Times Higher Education made for interesting reading if considered side by side

Imperial sartorial research Subscription

19 February 2015

The results of the research excellence framework reveal that 52,061 full-time equivalent academic staff…

Are we not human? Subscription

19 February 2015

I have long struggled to establish anthropology as a subject to be taught outside the university setting

Language isn’t the problem Subscription

19 February 2015

The debate about inadequate English language proficiency often focuses on the wrong issues

Drawing a blank Subscription

19 February 2015

I was deeply offended by the blank space on the back page of Times Higher Education

A chance to rethink the current model Subscription

12 February 2015

Ministers and the higher education community are rightly asking tough questions about quality assurance and the safeguarding of public funding now that private providers are offering degree courses

Plenty of buck but no bang Subscription

12 February 2015

Carl Lygo’s argument that a university course is poor value for money is strengthened when costs in other educational sectors are compared

Collaborative challenges Subscription

12 February 2015

In suggesting that academe and industry need to work more closely together, Mark Samuels is revisiting one of the central aims of LINK – launched by the government in 1988 and running well into the 2000s

Rising above the mob Subscription

12 February 2015

When respected scholars enter a public debate, one would hope that their arguments uphold the same principles that underpin their research, namely accuracy and objectivity

You can never go back Subscription

12 February 2015

Reading the results of the Best University Workplace Survey 2015 reminded me of when I worked in a new university in England

Lessons from Ebola crisis Subscription

12 February 2015

During the Ebola outbreak in 2014, Peter Piot made a cogent comment on the role of academics in response to a global crisis. I would also like to share a view…

Language is not the issue Subscription

12 February 2015

As someone whose job it is to teach English for academic purposes, and who works with international students at higher education level, I read with interest the article “Scholars highlight inadequate language skills”

Lodging a complaint Subscription

12 February 2015

David Lodge’s novels deal with the relations between academia and the outside world. They are highly realistic in terms of detail but questionable for the values that they promote

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