Cookie policy: This site uses cookies to simplify and improve your usage and experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information on how we use and manage cookies please take a look at our privacy and cookie policies. Your privacy is important to us and our policy is to neither share nor sell your personal information to any external organisation or party; nor to use behavioural analysis for advertising to you.

House of Lords backs tuition fee hike despite a last-minute bid to derail the proposals

Plans to almost triple the tuition fee cap to £9,000 have passed through Parliament after being backed by the House of Lords.

Labour’s last-minute attempt to derail the proposals failed after peers voted down two “fatal” amendments tabled by the party.

It means universities look set to be able to charge much higher fees from 2012-13, although they will be required to sign agreements on widening access for poor students if they charge more than £6,000 a year.

Speakers in last night’s debate included Lord Browne of Madingley, whose controversial report paved the way for the government’s plans. He said he “strongly supported” the measures despite differences from those proposed by his review.

Among those voicing concerns was Liberal Democrat education specialist Baroness Sharp of Guildford, who said she had “substantial reservations” about the proposals.

These included the fact that by switching to loans, the government was moving taxpayers’ investment in higher education “off the books” to tackle the deficit.

“That is very convenient, but it will come back on to the national debt at a later point”, she said.

Peers voted by a majority of 68 against Labour’s amendment to stop the basic level of university fees rising to £6,000 and by a majority of 73 to block its move against raising the higher cap on fees to £9,000.

There was little in the way of protest outside the Lords, unlike last week when thousands of students protested outside Parliament as MPs voted through the plans by a majority of 21.

simon.baker@tsleducation.com

Readers' comments (1)

  • The UK is increasing spending on foreign aid by 37%. It is disappointing that the government don't think that spending on universities is as important as foreign aid. I don't think the young people protesting have realised this. There is a limited supply of UK taxpayer money available and it should be invested in the future of the UK to try to try to prevent its demise. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/spending-review/8076707/Spending-review-Development-aid-money-to-Third-World-to-rise-by-40-per-cent.html

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Print
  • Share
  • Save
  • Print
  • Share
  • Save
Jobs