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Kingston v-c to step down in December

Sir Peter Scott departs ahead of scheduled retirement to take up post elsewhere, reports Simon Baker

Sir Peter Scott is stepping down as vice-chancellor of Kingston University to take up a post at another institution, it was announced today.

A university spokeswoman said Professor Scott, who has been vice-chancellor at Kingston since January 1998, would retire from the role on 31 December. He was officially due to retire as vice-chancellor in summer 2011.

Kingston did not confirm where he would be moving, but it is understood that he is to take up a professorship rather than a new vice-chancellorial role.

Professor Scott said: “I have enjoyed every moment of my time here at Kingston – and I know I will go on enjoying it for the next seven months, and will continue to work to ensure Kingston prospers in the years ahead.”

“I am, and always will be, very proud of Kingston – and of all its staff and students.”

Before his job as vice-chancellor at Kingston, he was pro vice-chancellor and professor of education at the University of Leeds.

Professor Scott, who is 64, was editor of the Times Higher Education Supplement from 1976 to 1992.

simon.baker@tsleducation.com

Update

Kingston University has confirmed that Sir Peter Scott is to take up a post as professor of higher education studies at the Institute of Education, University of London, after he retires as vice-chancellor of Kingston on 31 December.

Readers' comments (1)

  • If i was a professor, you would expect me to have published academic articles, but as I am not a professor and not claiming to be, it is irrelevant.

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    Ann Mroz, Editor

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