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Data from Thomson Reuters’s Journal Citation Reports for the Social Sciences, 2007

Top journals in history ranked by 2007 impact factor

 Journal Citations in 2007 to articles from 2005-06Impact factor for 2007Number of articles in 2007
1American Historical Review 8871.47624
2Environmental History2370.97628
3Journal of American History5120.85116
4Past and Present5690.60746
5Journal of African History3040.50018
6Journal of Modern History2670.41517
7Journal of Social History2530.34834
8Comparative Studies in Society and History5040.19734
9English Historical Review2430.19325
The data above provide the latest ranking by impact factor for journals of history indexed by Thomson Reuters in its Journal Citations Report for the social sciences for 2007. Nine of 17 history journals in this database received 200 or more citations in 2007 to their 2005 and 2006 articles, and those nine are listed above. The impact factor is simply one measure of a journal’s influence (there are many others). It is a weighted measure – of citations per paper – and as such it is an attempt to compare journals of the same subject area that publish different numbers of papers each year. Journals producing many articles would typical attract more citations than those publishing comparatively fewer articles. The impact factor is calculated as citations in Year C to a journal’s contents in years A and B, divided by the number of regular articles and reviews published in years A and B. As such, this is a relatively short-term measure of journal influence. In a field such as history, articles tend to receive citations many years after their publication, and the peak citation rate may be five to ten years after an article appears. For this reason, the above ranking should be interpreted as “early returns” on the current status of professional journals in history.

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