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A lesson in what the LSE teaches 2

Erik Ringmar may be hitting some targets square on the bull's-eye with his comments on the function of universities for employers.

He claims that by picking students from the best universities, employers can acquire "...bright and competitive young men and women who are prepared to subject themselves to hours and hours of mindless exercises under stressful conditions".

This is why, according to Ringmar, a student "would be a fool to pick (London Metropolitan University)... "over the London School of Economics (one of our "best" universities).

There are some areas where students can find work without this type of employer: small business enterprises or companies that have devolved responsibility to small units.

Many of my former communications students at London Met, whose courses required creativity and original research, now work for small companies, or have set up their own businesses, from film production companies to consultancies. This allows them to engage in a variety of genuinely creative enterprises of their own devising.

Perhaps this demonstrates that London Met is a good place to go if you want to find work that is creative and self-initiated, as opposed to going to the LSE to train for a mindless and stressful job.

Mo Dodson. London Metropolitan University

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