Cookie policy: This site uses cookies to simplify and improve your usage and experience of this website. Cookies are small text files stored on the device you are using to access this website. For more information on how we use and manage cookies please take a look at our privacy and cookie policies. Your privacy is important to us and our policy is to neither share nor sell your personal information to any external organisation or party; nor to use behavioural analysis for advertising to you.

UK considers allowing women to donate eggs for cloning research only

Brussels, 15 Feb 2006

The UK's fertility watchdog is considering a change to its rules that would allow British women to donate their eggs solely for the purposes of therapeutic cloning research.

Under the current guidelines, only women undergoing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or other gynaecological treatments are allowed to donate eggs for research purposes. However, a shortage of donated eggs is restricting embryonic stem cell research in the UK, and has led the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) to propose the change of rules.

Opponents of the move argue that egg donation is an invasive procedure that can lead to potential complications, including fertility problems and, in rare cases, kidney damage and death. Such donations are already approved for those who want to help infertile couples to conceive, and proponents say that women should also be allowed to take on these risks for the benefit of scientific research if they so choose.

Ainsley Newson, a lecturer in medical ethics at the University of Bristol, told The Times of London: 'So long as women are made fully aware of these [risks] and are not put under dress, they should have every opportunity to participate.'

The HFEA has said that it will ban the practice of allowing researchers to donate eggs to their own laboratories, following the case of the Korean cloning pioneer Woo Suk Hwang, who had used eggs donated by junior researchers in his own team in his now discredited research. It is expected that researchers will be allowed to donate eggs to other laboratories, however.

While some press reports have suggested that the HFEA is ready to approve the new rules during a meeting on 15 February, a spokesperson for the body said that the outcome of the discussion is not a foregone conclusion. 'As a responsible regulator, we have to look at this closely,' he told the BBC.

Further information

CORDIS RTD-NEWS/© European Communities, 2005
Item source Previous Item Back to Titles Print Item

  • Print
  • Share
  • Save
  • Print
  • Share
  • Save
Jobs